Jog log: Early bird

Achievement of the week. I managed to go running twice this week – in the morning before work.

It’s cold and dark. Getting outside and getting started is the challenge.

Running is fun. And overcoming my inner pig dog (only Germans have this) is even better.

UX and Scrum

For future reference:

UX Oxford: Roman Pichler on “UX and Scrum: How do UX and Scrum fit together?” from Oxford Computer Consultants on Vimeo.

Via UX and Scrum.

It’s good to see some discussion of this topic.

It’s a challenging topic. Especially if you have a distributed team with team members in different geographic areas and time zones.

If you prepare designs too far in advance, there’s a high probability that the feature will evolve and change. The designs you make are outdated by the time the developers get there. And all you’re doing is creating waste.

If you’re designing too close to a sprint (e.g. in the week before it will be implemented), there is a high risk that the designer and UX questions show what’s missing in the user story. This starts discussions with the product owner and other stakeholders. In my experience, it’s the wireframes and the screens that trigger more and deeper responses and discussions from product owners and project leaders, compared to their own written business requirements.

In general, the UX discussion gets very difficult if there is not enough information on the end-user and how they will use the app; no direct access to real clients for questions and surveys.